Judging Gary

I’m using the bathroom at Barnes & Nobles the other day when I noticed two men arguing a few stalls away from me. I couldn’t make out their conversation, but from the looks of their facial expression and by their tone of voice I could tell this was something intense. This went on for about 10 minutes before one of the men stormed out of the bathroom yelling in rage. I was concerned. Gary, the remaining man in the bathroom, stared into the mirror with confusion. After pounding his fist forcefully onto the bathroom counter, he then shouted,” What the fuck is a homeless person suppose to look like!? Just because I’m not walking around smelling bad with ripped clothes I’m not homeless?”

A conversation with Gary quickly revealed the problem. I was shocked to find out he actually was homeless! He didn’t fit the stereotypical description, but this was the problem. I’m assuming Gary had asked this gentleman for some help, but because of his appearance this man thought Gary was a lair. It wasn’t too long before their conversation turned into an argument.

I have to be honest, I found the entire situation to be hilarious. People are judgmental, I’ve accepted that. What’s so perplexing is how a homeless man had to fight for his own credibility, just because his appearance didn’t match his living conditions. I always stress the importance of never judging a book by its cover. Despite how cliche that may sound, the statement remains true. I will always have hope for our society, I just wish people spent a little less time judging and more time developing a sense of compassion for the people in this world.

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6 thoughts on “Judging Gary

  1. mltrautz@yahoo.com says:

    Oh, my. That’s a story worth remembering. My husband used to worry that I didn’t dress my kids up when we went to the doctor. I said, they’re sick, their clothes don’t matter. I am still known by the people in the office as the mother who makes everyone smile no matter how stressed I am.
    I can’t imagine trying to look like people expect. Good for the homeless man for taking care of himself.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. doublepointedlove says:

    What makes it hard is to have people approach you and ask for money. They must think since I’m at a store I have money to spare. My family works hard and sometimes it’s difficult for us to pay our own bills and to set food on the table. So when I apply “I don’t have spare change but I can get you something from inside the grocery store” I get, ” I don’t need the food I need the money for gas or a bus ride to see a sick …” I am and continue trying to be a compassionate person it just gets hard seeing the same people asking for the same thing. I hope I don’t sound crass but sometimes my faith in people feels tainted. Which brings me to this, Thank you for this beautiful blog about people and their stories. It makes me remember that we all have our battles in life and no matter our differences we all need to be treated humanely and with respect, the person who is asking for something and the person they are approaching. I look forward to seeing new pictures of people and their stories🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Becca D says:

    Reading through several of your posts, I really admire your desire to give people a voice–especially those in such challenging situations who are often judged so harshly by society. Bless you and your heart of gold!

    Liked by 1 person

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